Important Safety Information | Full Prescribing Information

See for Yourself

Mirena is an IUD made of soft, flexible plastic that’s placed into your uterus by a healthcare provider.

Other Videos

Kim’s StoryKim’s Story

Kim wanted birth control
with no daily routine.

Important Safety Information | Full Prescribing Information

Kim’s Story

Kim wanted birth control with no daily routine.

Other Videos

See for YourselfSee for Yourself

Effective birth control that lasts for as
long as Kim wants, for up to 5 years.

Important Safety Information | Full Prescribing Information

A Mother’s Thoughts

A mother considers her reasons
for choosing Mirena.

Other Videos

Kim’s StoryKim’s Story

Kim wanted birth control
with no daily routine.

Start Talking About Mirena

Use this guide to ask your doctor if Mirena is right for you.

Get a discussion guide
Complete an Interactive Questionnaire

Answer a series of questions about your birth control needs and learn more about Mirena.

Start now

Who Is Mirena Right For?

Mirena may be a good choice if you already have at least one child

Mirena isn’t for everyone

Only you and your healthcare provider can decide if Mirena is right for you. As the two of you discuss your options, there are a number of things you should share—like your general health, current or past health conditions, sexual history, and the possibility that you’d like to have more children in the future.

Consider Mirena if you already have at least
one child and

You want birth control that lasts up to 5 years

You want to have more children…someday

You’re happy with the size of your family

You’re not sure if you want more children

You recently had a baby (6 weeks ago or more) and you’re looking for an option that fits your birth control needs. Mirena should not be placed earlier than 6 weeks after you give birth or as directed by your healthcare provider

If you are breastfeeding and plan to continue breastfeeding after
Mirena is placed—be sure to tell your healthcare provider as there
is an increased risk of perforation

Mirena isn’t appropriate for you if you:

Might be pregnant

Have had a serious pelvic infection called pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) unless you have had a normal pregnancy after the infection went away

Have an untreated pelvic infection now

Have had a serious pelvic infection in the past 3 months after a pregnancy

Can get infections easily. For example, if you have

More than one sexual partner or your partner has more than one partner

Problems with your immune system

Intravenous drug abuse

Have or suspect you might have cancer of the uterus or cervix

Have bleeding from the vagina that has not been explained

Have liver disease or a liver tumor

Have breast cancer now or in the past or suspect you have breast cancer

Have an intrauterine device in your uterus already

Have a condition of the uterus that changes the shape of the uterine cavity, such as large fibroid tumors

Are allergic to levonorgestrel, silicone or polyethylene

Breastfeeding & Mirena

In general, there have been no adverse effects found in breastfeeding performance for women using Mirena, though isolated cases of decreased milk production have been reported. There have also been no adverse effects found in the health, growth, or Talk to your healthcare provider if you are breastfeeding.development of nursed babies. However, small amounts of the hormone Mirena releases pass into the breast milk of nursing mothers and are detectable in the infant’s blood. During placement, the risk of perforation is increased in women who are breastfeeding. Mirena should not be placed until at least 6 weeks after giving birth or as directed by your healthcare provider.

If you think Mirena may be right for you, have a conversation with your healthcare provider, who can help decide which birth control option is best for you.

Next: Mirena For Heavy Periods